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Posts Tagged ‘natural history’

Biological Photography Museum

I was having a wander through the museum at Biological Photography and Imaging yesterday and I came across some very strange items { well to me they were } and I am not talking about Dr David Fox the museum curator.

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Odd things in that museum, even the Kilner jar. Dr Tom Hartman said that it was unique in the fact that they stop making these jars back during the war when the factory was blow up. There is a lot to look at and photograph in this museum more then enough to hold anyone’s attention. If you have a interest in old bones, fish heads, small hedgehogs and strange looking mussels then drop a line to thomas.hartman@nottingham.ac.uk if you would like to know more on the course we run at Nottingham University, MSc Biological Photography and Imaging then contact david.mcmahon@nottingham.ac.uk

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Male wolf spiders cannibalise older females, scientists in Uruguay have discovered. In several species, female spiders are known to eat males, but this is the first time biologists have seen the roles reversed in the wild.
The male spiders were observed mating with virgins and eating older, less reproductively successful females. Researchers suggest that harsh habitats force males to prey on females for food.
Their findings were published in the Biological Journal of the Linnean Society. The species in question, Allocosa brasiliensis, is a nocturnal wolf spider found in South America’s sand dunes along riverbanks and the Atlantic Ocean coast.

Full story

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Carol Grant
Winner of the 2009 Nature Conservancy Photo Contest

Growing up in Southern California, Carol Grant has always been intrigued by the beauty of the ocean. “As a child, I vividly remember watching episodes of Sea Hunt after school and wondering if I could ever have underwater adventures too,” says Carol.

This curiosity led Carol to pick up a camera. “I think [al]most anyone who has a passion for the natural world dreams of being able to communicate that beauty through photographs,” she says.

As her experiences with marine life grew, Carol says she became determined to learn how to photograph the unique creatures and habitats with which she fell in love. “Underwater photography is challenging because it entails not only a knowledge of photography, but specialized equipment knowledge, excellent buoyancy skills and confidence in handling oneself well underwater at the same time,” explains Carol.

Full story at Nature Conservancy

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RL Hopkins.

Normally, books on wildlife photography are packed with sumptuous, ultra close shots of wild life, going about their natural business, unaware of a photographer only metres away.This book has that, but takes the story further by tipping in wild, wild shots of the natural environment, icebergs, cascading rivers, caves, deserts and more. Author Hopkins has covered the wild world for over 20 years, moving from large and medium format cameras to 35mm SLRs, 4×5 sheet film, 645 trannies and on to digital capture. He confides that “photography found me later in life, a consequence of my background in geology and affinity for nature and wild places.” He suggests that you can use this book as a workbook, accessing its contents without any particular order. The messages are clear: know your equipment; be as open as possible to what nature presents; be in the right place at the right time. Preparation is crucial; know the seasons and their characteristics; understand the seasonal patterns of wildlife behaviour. Frequently, the inside knowledge you can gain may not come from photographers but from locals who live in the territory. Gear up with precise knowledge of your equipment; make sure you understand all the camera’s features; comprehend the role of the histogram to fully utilize the image’s brightness range; pack a wide range of lenses; always use a tripod … and so on. The info is techy but highly readable, which makes the book a good read in its own right. Hopkins’ writing style is conversational, with the occasional anecdote to leaven the text. I figure the book would appeal both to beginner and experienced wild life enthusiast. Also, I enjoyed the many images that verged on the abstract … you don’t always need to shoot sharp, clean and clear. Fuzzy is sometimes the way to go!

 

 

 

Author: RL Hopkins.
Publisher: Lark Books.
Length: 240 pages.
ISBN: 978 1 60059 522 6

And a good price at on line book stores.

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Although emasculated spiders can no longer be lovers, they are better fighters, a new study says.

In many spider species, males have sex using two appendages known as pedipalps. But males will often lose one or both pedipalps during the act—behavior that might seem like a bad idea evolutionarily, since it renders the male sterile.

See the story here

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Emma Clark has sent through this information.

BWPA – British Wildlife Photography Awards, a competition celebrating the diversity of the natural history of the British Isles

Animal Portraits, Animal Behaviour, Urban Wildlife, Hidden Britain, Coast and Marine, Wildlife in my Backyard, Habitat and Living Landscape: Connectivity

Examples

Bee species pollinating crops directly links wildlife with the economy

Salt marshes acting as a buffer between land and seas

Hedgerows play a part in keeping the countryside ‘stitched’ together

Estuaries are the connection for freshwater species with marine life

Rivers connecting streams to the sea


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Martin Parr

If you ever get a chance to listen to Martin speak then do not miss it.

Royal Photographic Society (RPS) members were extremely honoured last night to have guest speaker Martin Parr give them a talk on his work. Martin Parr was giving his talk at King’s College London, it had been organised by the Visual Journalism Group. Martin Parr is an honorary member of the RPS as well as a Centenary Medallist and Magnum photographer.

Martins started photographing with black and white 35mm film, he later switched to colour photography in the early eighty’s. He is well known for his work on human behaviour and satirical view of contemporary society.

The English genius of Human Behavior photography.

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