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Posts Tagged ‘plants’

RL Hopkins.

Normally, books on wildlife photography are packed with sumptuous, ultra close shots of wild life, going about their natural business, unaware of a photographer only metres away.This book has that, but takes the story further by tipping in wild, wild shots of the natural environment, icebergs, cascading rivers, caves, deserts and more. Author Hopkins has covered the wild world for over 20 years, moving from large and medium format cameras to 35mm SLRs, 4×5 sheet film, 645 trannies and on to digital capture. He confides that “photography found me later in life, a consequence of my background in geology and affinity for nature and wild places.” He suggests that you can use this book as a workbook, accessing its contents without any particular order. The messages are clear: know your equipment; be as open as possible to what nature presents; be in the right place at the right time. Preparation is crucial; know the seasons and their characteristics; understand the seasonal patterns of wildlife behaviour. Frequently, the inside knowledge you can gain may not come from photographers but from locals who live in the territory. Gear up with precise knowledge of your equipment; make sure you understand all the camera’s features; comprehend the role of the histogram to fully utilize the image’s brightness range; pack a wide range of lenses; always use a tripod … and so on. The info is techy but highly readable, which makes the book a good read in its own right. Hopkins’ writing style is conversational, with the occasional anecdote to leaven the text. I figure the book would appeal both to beginner and experienced wild life enthusiast. Also, I enjoyed the many images that verged on the abstract … you don’t always need to shoot sharp, clean and clear. Fuzzy is sometimes the way to go!

 

 

 

Author: RL Hopkins.
Publisher: Lark Books.
Length: 240 pages.
ISBN: 978 1 60059 522 6

And a good price at on line book stores.

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Thank you to  Siôn Prys Davies

The Environmental Photographer of the Year 2011 competition is now open, and this year a new video category has been introduced to further raise awareness of environmental and social issues.

Organised by the Chartered Institution of Water and Environmental Management (CIWEM) since 2007, the Environmental Photographer of the

Deadline 31st July

See webpage

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Dr David Fox keeps some odd and curious items in his museum of Natural History, bones, jars and pickled specimens. There are stuffed foxes, badgers and birds, bird’s nests, bees and months, spiders small and large but nothing as large as the ostrich skeleton which lurks in a cupboard, shelf’s full of cures from a witches cauldron but it’s the wizard within David that finds all of these items for the students at The School of Biology to photograph.

David’s vast knowledge cannot be encompassed within a book; it’s the living version of Google. Ask him a question like Jeeves and out pops the answer not wrapped in a scientific envelope of misunderstanding but with words that help you explore more into a world of Natural History.

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Emma Clark  has placed this information on facebook, it has now been re-posted here. Thank you Emma.

The EDGE of Existence programme highlights and conserves one-of–a-kind species that are on the verge of extinction.

Edge species are truly one of a kind. If they disappear there will be nothing similar left on the planet. Two-thirds are receiving little or no conservation attention. Help save these remarkable species.

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If you can make this seminar then make it, £20.00 to listen to a great photographer is cheap.

Landscape photographer Charlie Waite will be giving an exclusive evening seminar at Calumet’s Drummond Street store on Tuesday, 22nd February. Starting at 5pm, the seminar will cover two main topics – ‘Influences’, and ‘Small on Landscape’, a fully illustrated talk on photography using a compact camera. Tickets for the Calumet seminar are £20 and are now on sale at the website below.

Website: Light & Land

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The government has put on hold plans to sell off some English forests – but the main scheme could still go ahead. Proposals to offload 258,000 hectares run by the Forestry Commission have attracted cross-party criticism and a public outcry. The planned sale of 15% of state-owned forests will be put on hold, ministers said, as they “re-examine the criteria” for disposing of them. Labour said it was a “panic measure” and would not silence the protests. The government is allowed to sell off 15% of England’s woodlands in each four year public spending period – and that is what the announcement relates to. Full story

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The Woodland Trust

The best things on the plant has to be a tree. You would be hard pressed to say what does not depend on trees.Without them we would be in trouble The Woodland Trust does the very best job of ensuring that our native woodland remains  the crown of our natural heritage. Help them to keep it that way if there was one thing to support then let it be this.

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