Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘animals’

RL Hopkins.

Normally, books on wildlife photography are packed with sumptuous, ultra close shots of wild life, going about their natural business, unaware of a photographer only metres away.This book has that, but takes the story further by tipping in wild, wild shots of the natural environment, icebergs, cascading rivers, caves, deserts and more. Author Hopkins has covered the wild world for over 20 years, moving from large and medium format cameras to 35mm SLRs, 4×5 sheet film, 645 trannies and on to digital capture. He confides that “photography found me later in life, a consequence of my background in geology and affinity for nature and wild places.” He suggests that you can use this book as a workbook, accessing its contents without any particular order. The messages are clear: know your equipment; be as open as possible to what nature presents; be in the right place at the right time. Preparation is crucial; know the seasons and their characteristics; understand the seasonal patterns of wildlife behaviour. Frequently, the inside knowledge you can gain may not come from photographers but from locals who live in the territory. Gear up with precise knowledge of your equipment; make sure you understand all the camera’s features; comprehend the role of the histogram to fully utilize the image’s brightness range; pack a wide range of lenses; always use a tripod … and so on. The info is techy but highly readable, which makes the book a good read in its own right. Hopkins’ writing style is conversational, with the occasional anecdote to leaven the text. I figure the book would appeal both to beginner and experienced wild life enthusiast. Also, I enjoyed the many images that verged on the abstract … you don’t always need to shoot sharp, clean and clear. Fuzzy is sometimes the way to go!

 

 

 

Author: RL Hopkins.
Publisher: Lark Books.
Length: 240 pages.
ISBN: 978 1 60059 522 6

And a good price at on line book stores.

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Thank you to  Siôn Prys Davies

The Environmental Photographer of the Year 2011 competition is now open, and this year a new video category has been introduced to further raise awareness of environmental and social issues.

Organised by the Chartered Institution of Water and Environmental Management (CIWEM) since 2007, the Environmental Photographer of the

Deadline 31st July

See webpage

Read Full Post »

Red kites are now a much more common sight

 

 

People are used to stories of conversational doom-and-gloom with fragile species threatened by creeping urbanisation, but recent reports suggest some birds of prey are booming in the UK. So why does the prospect of a soaring hawk or eagle leave some people worried?

Full Story

Read Full Post »

Construction and set building day, the students are learning how to construct a natural looking environment within the studio, these set are to be designed and lit as if they were in an outside environment, the lighting was to give the impression it was either that of daylight or moonlight. The subjects that the students could photograph were rats, geckos, snails, hissing cockroaches, scorpions and museum subjects. The sets involved constructing a small section of a wall [brickwork] a waste pipe and a grate on this set the rat is placed,the rat is photographed at  the pipe and grate to indicate it was foraging for food, the students are to make this look as convincing as possible with the use of mud to act as mortar and weeds and vegetation. The light from the bowens flash head is diffused and the use of a card to break up the light to make it look like it is flowing through trees and leaves.

Read Full Post »

Dr David Fox keeps some odd and curious items in his museum of Natural History, bones, jars and pickled specimens. There are stuffed foxes, badgers and birds, bird’s nests, bees and months, spiders small and large but nothing as large as the ostrich skeleton which lurks in a cupboard, shelf’s full of cures from a witches cauldron but it’s the wizard within David that finds all of these items for the students at The School of Biology to photograph.

David’s vast knowledge cannot be encompassed within a book; it’s the living version of Google. Ask him a question like Jeeves and out pops the answer not wrapped in a scientific envelope of misunderstanding but with words that help you explore more into a world of Natural History.

Read Full Post »

Bizarre Animal Photography. Here are some interesting animal portraits, can you name these animals

Read Full Post »

“Sexual Nature” at the Natural History Museum explores the diverse ways in which animals have evolved to procreate, such as a snail’s love darts, the detachable penis of the paper nautilus, or the outsized testes of the promiscuous chimp.The exhibition,  open on Friday 11th Feb, also looks at human sexual behaviour in the context of other species. Full story

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »